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Plain English campaign news articles

Plain English Campaign Awards 2016

It’s Plain English Campaign awards day.

This year we’re delighted to applaud the likes of Mr Justice Peter Jackson, James Westhead, SSE, Bank of Ireland, the NSPCC and NHS Health Scotland.

Read more: Plain English Campaign Awards 2016

Government Latin ban

The Government has taken the surprising step of banning Latin abbreviations from its websites.

So e.g., i.e. and etc will all soon be booted off GOV.UK pages, apparently because foreign readers find them ‘difficult to read’. A spokesman said the phrases could even confuse English speakers who were ‘under stress or in a hurry’.

Read more: Government Latin ban

NHS secrecy row

This time last year, the NHS was ‘restructured’, apparently to make sure the needs of specific parts of the UK got the services they needed. Each new area was told it had to provide Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), which would set out what that individual area needed, and how it would go about delivering those needs.
 
As part of that, all those different areas of the NHS came together in January this year to form 44 STP ‘footprints’, which would show a bigger picture of what was needed and where, and what was being done to help the patients in each area. The results of these plans and footprints would then supposedly help put into place structured five-year plans.
 

Read more: NHS secrecy row

Bank of England jargon far too taxing

For decades now, we at Plain English Campaign have added our voice to those justifiably complaining about jargon in a number of areas. Financial jargon may well be at the top of the list of complaints we’ve received, and things don’t seem to be improving.

And with Brexit officially on the horizon (March/April has been mentioned) we really do need to know what is going on with the country’s banks and, in turn, our own finances.

Read more: Bank of England jargon far too taxing

Councils ignore plain English guidelines

You may recall recent Government guidelines that made plain English ‘mandatory for all of Gov.UK’. Well, it seems that ‘mandatory’ means different things to different councils.

A recent independent report looked closely at up to 100 pages on 191 local authority websites. The findings suggest that 82% of the information checked is ‘confusing readers by failing to use plain English’.

Read more: Councils ignore plain English guidelines

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