News

Plain English campaign news articles

Steve McClaren scores another own goal with Foot in Mouth award

Unemployed Steve McClaren has received another blow while he counts his two million pound payoff. The ex-England boss has won the Plain English Campaign’s Foot in Mouth Award for this piece of footballing wisdom:

'He (Wayne Rooney) is inexperienced, but he's experienced in terms of what he's been through.'

He wins the award despite strong entries from George Bush and Jeremy Kyle.
Last year Naomi Campbell joined previous winners Donald Rumsfeld, Richard Gere and Tracey Emin as the public figure who had made the most baffling comment.

Seven Golden Bulls have been awarded this year, including one to Richard Branson’s Virgin Trains for a response from the company about problems booking online. UKTV have won one for an extremely enthusiastic press release about their new channel, ‘Dave’. In a year where silly signs seem to have dominated the news, BAA at Gatwick Airport have won a Golden Bull for a fine example.

Top comedian and TV personality Lenny Henry will present the awards at the Brewery, Chiswell Street, London EC1Y 4SD on 11 December 2007. It will be the 28th annual Plain English awards ceremony.

Winners of Plain English Awards include Liverpool Housing Trust for their ‘Pictorial Tenancy Agreement’ and Alistair Macintosh, Huart Tai Huang and Geoffrey Holden FRICS for their ‘Guide to surveyors’ jargon.’ Stockport Women’s Aid will also pick up a Plain English Award for an advice booklet.

The National School of Government and the Forestry Commission are amongst the winners for the Inside Write Awards. These are given to government departments for clear internal communication.

Media winners include the first International Media award winner, Bruce Hill from the Australian Broadcasting Company, and BBC Five Live’s Midday News which scooped ‘Best National Radio programme’. Teletext has won the Osborne Award for their contribution to plain English.

Lack of clarity earns 0% for families

Revelations from the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) market study released today have reinforced the damning criticisms about bank charges that continue to arrive at Plain English Campaign from members of the public. Based on the OFT findings, the lack of clarity in some communications is a major reason for banks having poor relationships with customers.

While many banks acknowledge that plain language enables better financial management for both themselves and their customers, there is an obvious need for legislation in this area to ensure consistency for the customer.

Financial organisations have a responsibility to answer and help people as part of their service. But the current financial climate has highlighted that unclear and misleading information can cause peope financial hardship. For instance, recent customer marketing from one major bank claims to counteract the effects of the 'credit crunch' by offering emergency funds. In fact these funds are no more than an addititional overdraft facility at a hugely inflated interest rate.

Plain English Campaign's founder Chrissie Maher OBE said, "The grass roots issue here is that clear communications can make the difference between a family being out on the street, or them getting through this period of economic challenge. Our key message is that clear communications empower the individual."

"Many organisations, particularly in the finance industry, already recognise the valuable contributions that crystal-clear language can offer in preventing the confusion around unnecessary and excessive charges. Over the coming months we will continue working with the banks and other consumer groups, and have offered our services to the OFT on this matter in the hope of achieving greater clarity, consistency and transparency throughout the industry."

Plain English is coming home

Plain English Campaign plans to play a major part in the “Liverpool - European Capital of Culture celebrations” - if it can find somewhere to accommodate an exhibition.

The national organisation shot to fame campaigning for clarity in the language used in official documents. It is also well - known for the “Golden Bull” awards it gives every year to people who have put “foot in mouth”, and for the Crystal Mark.

The roots of the Plain English Campaign are in Liverpool. Founder Chrissie Maher was one of the original team who worked on the groundbreaking Liverpool newspaper, the “Tuebrook Bugle”. Copies of the “Bugle” going back as far as 1971 will form part of the exhibition. Now she’s looking forward to showing how the campaign started and giving local people the opportunity to try Plain English for themselves through workshop sessions which will be offered as part of the Campaign’s exhibition.

“We are part of Liverpool and it’s history and culture so naturally we want to be part of the Capital of Culture celebrations. As the campaign grew out of the frustration of ordinary people in Liverpool with the way they were being treated we feel that it is right that we should return to the city at this time. We’ll be reminding everyone of the importance of clear language and how this can help people understand what to do and what is happening in their lives” says Chrissie.

“We need somewhere for our exhibition which is easy for people to get to but is also well - known so that everyone will know where we are. Language is one of the most important parts of any culture - and being understood is the key. Our presence at the City of Culture event should be central to a celebration of this City’s part in developing and promoting different aspects of our common culture. We’re speaking with the City Council and the University at the moment and hope to have more news soon.”

The Plain English Campaign are looking to run their exhibition in the city for over a month.during next summer.

Crystal Clear campaign wins victory for broadband users

The Crystal Clear Broadband campaign, launched by consumer magazine Computeractive, with support from Plain English Campaign, has convinced industry regulator Ofcom to force network providers to give customers clearer information about their internet connection speeds. More than 11,000 people signed a petition on the Downing Street website to put pressure on Ofcom to act.

The communications regulator has now introduced a Code of Practice that requires companies to give consumers an accurate estimate of the maximum speed their line can support before a contract is signed. Previously network providers were advertising super-fast connection speeds that were impossible to obtain for all but a very few of customers.

According to an Ofcom spokesman, the "issue of broadband speeds is an area of consumer interest and concern, as the Computeractive Crystal Clear campaign helped to highlight. Our Code of Practice will provide real clarity for consumers about the actual broadband speeds they can expect.

The regulator will also be carrying out what it has claimed is the UK's most authoritative and comprehensive broadband speed survey. This will identify actual broadband performance across the country and its relationship to advertised speeds. Many customers are still unaware that the actual speed they can get depends on a number of factors, including how near they live to their telephone exchange.

Steve McClaren scores another own goal with Foot in Mouth award (11 December 2007)

Unemployed Steve McClaren has received another blow while he counts his two million pound payoff. The ex-England boss has won the Plain English Campaign’s Foot in Mouth Award for this piece of footballing wisdom:

'He (Wayne Rooney) is inexperienced, but he's experienced in terms of what he's been through.'

He wins the award despite strong entries from George Bush and Jeremy Kyle.
Last year Naomi Campbell joined previous winners Donald Rumsfeld, Richard Gere and Tracey Emin as the public figure who had made the most baffling comment.

Seven Golden Bulls have been awarded this year, including one to Richard Branson’s Virgin Trains for a response from the company about problems booking online. UKTV have won one for an extremely enthusiastic press release about their new channel, ‘Dave’. In a year where silly signs seem to have dominated the news, BAA at Gatwick Airport have won a Golden Bull for a fine example.

Top comedian and TV personality Lenny Henry will present the awards at the Brewery, Chiswell Street, London EC1Y 4SD on 11 December 2007. It will be the 28th annual Plain English awards ceremony.

Winners of Plain English Awards include Liverpool Housing Trust for their ‘Pictorial Tenancy Agreement’ and Alistair Macintosh, Huart Tai Huang and Geoffrey Holden FRICS for their ‘Guide to surveyors’ jargon.’ Stockport Women’s Aid will also pick up a Plain English Award for an advice booklet.

The National School of Government and the Forestry Commission are amongst the winners for the Inside Write Awards. These are given to government departments for clear internal communication.

Media winners include the first International Media award winner, Bruce Hill from the Australian Broadcasting Company, and BBC Five Live’s Midday News which scooped ‘Best National Radio programme’. Teletext has won the Osborne Award for their contribution to plain English.

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