News

Plain English campaign news articles

The right side of the law

We’ve teamed up with West Mercia Police to help them rewrite their ‘missing person – risk assessment’ questionnaire.

In West Mercia there are on average around 6500 missing person reports opened up each year. The clarity of the questionnaire is absolutely crucial – it should now be that little bit easier to read.

Read more: The right side of the law

Football gobbledygook generator

You may be familiar with how football managers, players and pundits talk about the game. If so, the football gobbledygook generator will provide you with many examples of the kinds of nonsense they regularly produce.

If you’re not familiar with football jargon, try the generator anyway. See if you can make sense of a typical post-match comment – we doubt it!

Either way, we hope the new gobbledygook generator provides you with a bit of fun – and a reminder of what to expect at about five o’clock on a Saturday.

For more on our football gobbledygook generator, please check our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Plain English public notices

We’ve teamed up with Three Rivers District Council, Dacorum Borough Council and the RNIB (The Royal National Institute of Blind People) to develop Plain English guidelines for public legal notices.

As part of that, Three Rivers and Dacorum are running a brief national survey. Please complete the survey, which will only take a few minutes, and let us know what improvements you would make to public notices.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HCTSL37

The survey is open to everyone until September 4. Three Rivers will publish a summary of the results on their website (www.threerivers.gov.uk) by 1 October 2015.

Thank you for your time.

Updated web site

We have updated our website - we hope you find it easier to use.

If you find something that doesn't work, or can't find what you are looking for, please email us on info@plainenglish.co.uk.

Jobbledygook

How often have you read a job advertisement and wondered ‘what do they want, exactly?’

Jobs-market jargon may even have turned you away from a potential appointment. The Daily Telegraph’s Sophie Jamieson has provided a guide, and a quiz, to help you understand some of the terminology.

Read more: Jobbledygook

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